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4 encased cents, reverse of indian head, off center, horseshoe and a vulcanite encased

Oddball/Unusual Encased

"Use Starlight Worsted" Obverse a piece of cloth covers the cent.

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Reverse of Indian Cent

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Above is a very unusual encased Indian Cent. Instead of showing the obverse of the cent, a multi-color piece of cloth has been placed over the cent. The legend on the face of the encasement reads: USE STARLIGHT WORSTEDS. This is the only example of this encased that I have ever seen. It is 20 MM in diameter, the encasement just big enough to hold the cent. The obverse side also has a piece of clear plastic covering the cloth. I imagine that these were given out by traveling salesmen to advertise their product. I have had no success finding out about this company. Worsted is defined as a fine smooth yarn spun from combed long-staple wool (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/worsted).

Nothing unusual about Pan American Exposition encased coins? Right? Well, how about the one below.

1901 Pan Am Expo - obverse reads: "GOOD LUCK SOUVENIR / PAN - AMERICAN EXPOSITION" (left facing stem variety). Thanks to eBay seller rarecoincollector for permission to use his image.

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Reverse reads: "LUCKY PENNY / POCKET PIECE / I'M IT" with crossed horseshoes on reverse. Thanks to eBay seller rarecoincollector for permission to use his image.

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So what's the big deal with this piece? It is plated! Notice that the cent looks a lot like a 1943 steel cent. I have to imagine that this was done by the purchaser of the original encased cent after they bought the piece.



Welded encased 1937 cent - Obverse reads: TAYLOR HALL WELDING INC CORP. / WORCESTER, MASS

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Cent's reverse is covered by the metal - Reverse reads: WORCESTER-STAMPED METAL-CO / WORCHESTER, MASS. / QUALITY STAMPINGS

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Taylor Hall Stamped Metal-Co Steel Encased with two stamped steel pieces holding the coin instead of an aluminum encasement. The legend reads: TAYLOR HALL WELDING INC CORP. / WORCESTER, MASS on the obverse and WORCESTER-STAMPED METAL-CO / WORCHESTER, MASS. / QUALITY STAMPINGS. The center of the reverse has a raised area the diameter and thickness of a cent. Clearly demonstrating the stamping ability of the company. The reverse has thhe following legend: QUALITY STAMPINGS.

Edge of the Taylor Hall Stamping encased Indian Cent

Note that there are clearly two separate pieces of steel.

The piece is composed of two pieces of steel that have been stamped with the legends and to form the holder for the cent. The two pieces are then held together with two welds on the reverse. The cent is free-floating with a raised rim on the obverse to keep the cent in the encasement. The encasement is 32 MM in diameter and 2 MM at the edge and 4 MM in thickness at the raised portion. There are two pronounced "dimples" on the reverse side that are what hold the encasement together. Altogether a most unusual and interesting encased cent!

Obverse reads: "The Eagle / Chicago / 366 State ST."

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Reverse reads: "Thos. McGinnis / Prop. / Al Monahan / Manager / Chicago / I Bring Good Luck / Keep Me and Never Go Broke"

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I'm not sure what to call this shape. A modified horseshoe with an eagle and four-leaf clover? - (Hover over the image for enlarged view)

There is a four-leaf clover added to the bottom and an eagle at the top. The reverse advertises that "Thos. McGinnis/ Prop. / Al Monahan / Manager / Chicago / I Bring Good Luck / Keep Me and Never Go Broke" and includes the image of a "wishbone". The obverse advertises "The Eagle" (at the top), "366 State St." (on the left) and, "Chicago" (on the right).

Steel encased 1914 cent. B.A. Harlan Box 734 Red Lodge Mont.
Steel encased 1914 cent. B.A. Harlan Box 734 Red Lodge Mont.

Steel encased 1914 cent. It reads: "B.A. Harlan Box 734 Red Lodge Mont."

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Red Lodge Steel encased 1914 cent
Red Lodge Steel encased 1914 cent

Reverse reads: "KEEP ME AMD NEVER GO BROKE / GOOD LUCK"

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Other than the fact that this piece uses steel instead of aluminum, it is notable for all legends being incuse. Further, it features a swastika which up until the second world war was a good luck symbol.

Here are a few other odd or different encased coins.

1901 Pan Am with countermark/graffiti? Obverse reads: I BRING GOOD LUCK / KEEP ME AND NEVER GO BROKE There is also the number 1000 and ISL carved into the aluminum.

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The Reverse reads: LUCKEY PENNY / I'M IT / POCKET PIECE - Both Images Courtesy of Felix Nummus

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So why does this piece have 1000 carved into it? Or ISL? Someone's initials? It is a well-worn piece. The aluminum ring shows more wear than the cent. This is noticeable in the area of the encasement near the bottom. It brings up questions that I suspect will never be answered.

The encased above are without a question, odd or unusual and, yes dare I say FUN!. This, is of course, why I like them! If you roam around this site, you will find that there are many different styles and varieties of encased.

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